• In 2019, river traffic increased in the seaports of Antwerp, Hamburg and Constanţa while it remained at similar levels as the previous year in the port of Rotterdam and North Sea Port.

• The largest European inland port, Duisburg, recorded a 0.6% reduction in inland water traffic, due to losses in the transport of coal, steel and iron ore. The second largest, Paris, recorded a 14.6% increase, mainly driven by the transport of sands, stones and construction materials.

• A total of 2.1 million tonnes of goods were loaded or unloaded by inland vessels in the main ports from the Sava river basin in 2019. In this region, Serbia is the country where inland waterway traffic is the highest.

 

INLAND WATERWAY TRAFFIC IN MAIN EUROPEAN SEAPORTS

 


    Sources: Port Statistics, Eurostat [iww_go_aport], Panteia, CBS
    *North Sea Port is the name of the port formed by the cross-border merger between Zeeland Seaports (Flushing, Borsele and Terneuzen) in the Netherlands and Ghent Port Company in Belgium, signed on 8 December 2017. The cross-border merger port started to operate on 1 January 2018.

     

  • In Rotterdam, the largest European seaport, 85,969 inland vessels visited the port in 2019 (compared to 123,859 in 2018). Rotterdam remains the market leader in the Hamburg-Le Havre range by total maritime cargo throughput as it holds 36.4% of market shares, followed by Antwerp (18.4%), Hamburg (10.7%) and Amsterdam (8.3%) (Port of Rotterdam Authority, annual report 2019). Although the volume of loaded or unloaded IWT cargo at the port of Rotterdam was 152.8 million tonnes in 2019, and therefore on the same level as in 2018, important differences can be seen for dry and liquid cargo. The liquid cargo segment increased by 15%, while the dry cargo segment decreased by 14%. Container transport decreased by 5%. For both, outgoing traffic plays an important role at the port (almost 88% for dry cargo and 65% for liquid cargo).
  •  

    FIGURE 1: INLAND WATERWAY TRAFFIC IN THE SEAPORT OF ROTTERDAM (MILLION TONNES)


    Source: Port of Rotterdam
     

    FIGURE 2: INLAND WATERWAY TRAFFIC IN THE SEAPORT OF ROTTERDAM PER CARGO SEGMENT* (MILLION TONNES)


    Sources: Port of Rotterdam, CBS
    *General cargo is not taken into account in these calculations

     

  • In 2019, major investments were related to the construction of the Container Exchange Route (CER), the energy transition and digitisation (Port of Rotterdam Authority, annual report 2019). Nextlogic, the project which will make incoming container transport by barge more predictable and transhipment processes more efficient, is expected to be up and running in the course of 2020.
  • In Antwerp, 56,585 inland vessels frequented the port in 2019 (compared to 59,724 in 2018). The IWT goods traffic at the port of Antwerp increased in 2019, to reach a volume of 101.3 million tonnes of goods transported via inland navigation (compared to 99.3 in 2018). The share of imports increased slightly while exports remained stable.
  • This positive evolution in 2019 was mainly driven by an increase in transport of chemicals (+ 4.6%), which remains the most important segment for the port of Antwerp together with petroleum products. The two segments make up more than half of the total river traffic at the port.
  • Containers come close behind with a share of 25% of total river traffic and continue to follow a slightly increasing trend. While volumes of fertilizers, foodstuffs, animal fodder, agricultural products and live animals continued to follow an upward trend (+11%), volumes of iron ores, metal ware and metal wastes decreased (-14%). In 2019, the modal split within hinterland traffic was the following: road: 47%, barge: 44.7% and rail: 8.4% (compared to the following figures in 2018, road: 42%, barge: 46% and rail: 12%) ( New methodology implemented by the port for calculation of modal split data which led to an increase in modal split share for rail and IWT against road (with previous method, modal split figures in 2018 were the following: road: 56%, barge: 36% and rail: 8%)).
  •  

    FIGURE 3: INLAND WATERWAY TRAFFIC IN THE SEAPORT OF ANTWERP (MILLION TONNES)


    Source: Port of Antwerp
     

    FIGURE 4: INLAND WATERWAY TRAFFIC IN THE SEAPORT OF ANTWERP PER CARGO SEGMENT* (MILLION TONNES)


    Source: Port of Antwerp
    *Ro/ro, general and not assigned goods are not taken into account in these calculations (in 2019, the volume transported for these three cargo types amounted to 6.2 million tonnes, mostly attributed to conventional goods).

     

  • In the North Sea Port (Ghent, Terneuzen, Borsele, Flushing), total river traffic amounted to 58.5 million tonnes in 2019, a stable figure compared to 2018. In 2019, over 47,000 inland vessels entered North Sea Port to load and unload (around 40,000 in 2018).
  • North Sea Port is mostly a bulk port (both dry and liquid), the most important market segments being petroleum, mineral oil products as well as ores, food products and fertilizers.
  • Fifty-four percent of the goods are transported to the hinterland by means of inland waterway transport. The Port wishes to increase the modal share of inland navigation, particularly for the transport of containers, a segment where great efforts are being deployed. In addition, there is a growing market for parties who ‘bundle’ containers before they are transported to other ports by barge. The port is also looking forward to the realisation of the Seine-Scheldt project, which will allow inland vessels with a load capacity of 4,500 tonnes to travel up to Paris.
  •  

    FIGURE 5: INLAND WATERWAY TRAFFIC IN THE NORTH SEA PORT* (MILLION TONNES)


    Source: North Sea Port
    *Ro/ro and conventional cargo are not taken into account in these calculations (in 2019, the volume transported for these two cargo types amounted to 3.3 million tonnes, mostly attributed to conventional cargo).

     

  • Volumes transported by IWT decreased by 9.8% in 2019 compared to 2018 in the port of Hamburg. This result is mainly driven by the negative results for dry cargo, in particular coal. One reason for this decrease is the shift away from coal as a source of electricity generation in Germany. Overall, both dry and liquid cargo have been following a decreasing trend since 2015.
  • However, the situation is more positive for container transport. Contrary to the overall decline of 4.1% registered in Germany, an increase of 13% in container transport by inland vessels, with 145,078 TEU in 2019, has been recorded at the Port (Port of Hamburg press release “Container shipping into the hinterland on a good track“. This figure does not include the increased intra-port transhipment by barges in the Port of Hamburg).
  • Hinterland traffic (all modes) increased by 7.4% between 2018 and 2019. Within this hinterland traffic, inland waterway transport lost market shares to rail. It had a share of 9.2% in 2019, compared to 10.1% in 2018, while rail transport’s modal share was 49.4 % (compared to 47.1% in 2018). The road modal split share decreased from 42.8% to 41.4%. Incoming river traffic has a share of 47% in Hamburg and 53% is outgoing traffic.
  •  

    FIGURE 6: INLAND WATERWAY TRAFFIC IN THE SEAPORT OF HAMBURG (MILLION TONNES)


    Source: Statistical Office of Hamburg
     

    FIGURE 7: INLAND WATERWAY TRAFFIC IN THE SEAPORT OF HAMBURG PER CARGO SEGMENT* (MILLION TONNES)


    Source: Statistical Office of Hamburg
    *General cargo is not taken into account in these calculations

     
     

     

  • In Constanţa, 10,395 inland vessels called at the port in 2019. River traffic increased by almost 20%, to reach 15.1 million tonnes, mainly driven by an increase in transport of agricultural products, in particular cereals, iron ore and chemical products.
  • Mainly dry cargo is transported in the port of Constanţa, with a high share of 90.7% of the total goods transport. Dry cargo volumes rose by 20.8% compared to 2018. Liquid cargo represents 5.6% of total goods transport. Container, Ro/ro and general cargo amounted to 507 thousand tonnes in 2019, mostly attributed to general cargo. Indeed, container traffic in the port of Constanţa remains relatively low and consisted in 1,761 TEU in 2019.
  • International transport represents 56.2% of total river traffic. Constanţa is the seaport where the most river traffic is registered in Romania, before Galati, Cernavoda, Tulcea and Braila.
  •  

    FIGURE 8: INLAND WATERWAY TRAFFIC IN THE SEAPORT OF CONSTANŢA (MILLION TONNES)


    Source: Port of Constanţa/Romanian Statistical Office
     
     
     
     

    INLAND WATERWAY TRAFFIC IN MAIN EUROPEAN INLAND PORTS

     

      RHINE PORTS

       

      TABLE 1: WATERSIDE TRAFFIC IN MAJOR RHINE PORTS (MILLION TONNES)

       2017201820192019/2018
      Duisburg52.248.147.8-0.6%
      Cologne10.78.99.1+2.7%
      Mannheim9.77.57.9+5.3%
      Strasbourg8.05.97.5+28.5%
      Neuss8.07.66.9-9.4%
      Karlsruhe7.26.46.9+7.5%
      Ludwigshafen5.66.16.6+9.4%
      Basel5.84.76.1+29.1%
      Mulhouse4.84.44.9+12.9%
      Kehl3.53.94.2+7.2%
      Mainz2.93.23.7+16.3%
      Krefeld3.43.33.6+6.8%
      Wesseling2.62.02.7+35.9%
      Total124.4112.1118.1+5.4%

      Sources: Destatis, Port de Strasbourg, Swiss Rhine ports, Port de Mulhouse
      The “total” relates only to the ports mentioned in the table, not all Rhine ports.

       
       
      TOTAL YEARLY WATERSIDE TRAFFIC (MILLION TONNES)
       

       
       
       

      FRENCH AND BELGIAN PORTS

       

      TABLE 2: WATERSIDE TRAFFIC IN MAJOR FRENCH AND BELGIAN PORTS (MILLION TONNES)

       2017201820192019/2018
      Paris21.222.125.3+14.6%
      Liège15.916.016.00
      Strasbourg8.05.97.5+28.5%
      Brussels4.85.25.20
      Mulhouse4.84.44.9+12.9%
      Namur5.35.14.6-9.2%
      Metz1.61.92.2+14.3%
      Lille1.81.81.9+4.2%
      Lyon1.51.41.1-21.9%
      Villefranche-sur-Saône 0.80.80.80
      Chalon-sur-Saône and Mâcon1.10.80.80
      Thionville0.60.60.7+21.7%
      Total67.466.070.9+7.4%

      Sources: Ports de Paris, Port de Liège, Port de Strasbourg, Port de Mulhouse, Port de Bruxelles, Port de Namur, Nouveau port de Metz, Port de Lille, VNF
      The “total” relates only to the ports mentioned in the table, and not to all French and Belgian inland ports.

       
       
      TOTAL YEARLY WATERSIDE TRAFFIC (MILLION TONNES)
       

       
       
       

      DANUBE PORTS

       

      TABLE 3: WATERSIDE TRAFFIC IN LARGE DANUBE PORTS (MILLION TONNES)

       2017201820192019/2018
      Constanţa12.112.114.5+20.6%
      Galati6.36.45.9-7.5%
      Ismail5.14.74.3-8.5%
      Smederovo3.23.64.0+13.4%
      Linz4.23.23.4+6.6%
      Bratislava2.11.51.7+7.9%
      Tulcea1.31.71.6-5.0%
      Pancevo1.11.41.5+9.1%
      Novi Sad1.21.01.4+35.0%
      Regensburg1.51.11.3+18.1%
      Reni1.11.31.3-4.4%
      Vienna1.11.01.2+17.8%
      Drobeta Turnu Severin1.21.11.2+4.9%
      Călăraşi-Chiciu0.70.71.1+46.1%
      Prahovo0.91.01.1+5.3%
      Budapest-Csepel1.10.91.1+23.1%
      Măcin-Turcoaia0.80.80.9+18.8%
      Baja0.60.30.5+45.5%
      Total45.543.848.0+9.6%

      Sources: Danube Commission market observation, Romanian Statistical Institute, Hungarian Statistical Office, Destatis, Statistik Austria, Port Governance Agency of Serbia
      The “total” relates only to the ports mentioned in the table and not all Danube ports. The total waterside traffic of the Danube ports in 2019 amounted to 69 million tonnes (+13% compared to 2018).

       
       
      TOTAL YEARLY WATERSIDE TRAFFIC (MILLION TONNES)
       

       
       

      SAVA PORTS

       

      TABLE 4: WATERSIDE TRAFFIC IN MAJOR SAVA PORTS* (IN THOUSAND TONNES)

      Transhipment place2017201820192018/2019
      Other transhipment places (Serbia)-6829490.39
      Sremska Mitrovica (Serbia)1892345601.39
      Slavonski Brod (Croatia)1171311990.52
      Sabac (Serbia)170149149+/-0%
      Brčko (Bosnia and Herzegovina - BaH)136981250.27
      Sisak (Croatia)6066700.06
      Oil refinery Brod (BaH)9.7298.1-0.72
      Total682139020600.48

      Source: Sava Commission
      *In 2015, the port of Šamac in Bosnia and Herzegovina reported bankruptcy, therefore no transhipment of cargo recorded since then.

       
       
       
      TOTAL YEARLY WATERSIDE TRAFFIC (IN THOUSAND TONNES)
       

       
       

      FIGURE 9: EVOLUTION OF TRANSHIPPED GOODS IN THE SAVA RIVER BASIN IN TOTAL AND BROKEN DOWN PER COUNTRY OVER THE PERIOD 2010-2019* (THOUSAND TONNES)


      Source: Sava River Commission
      *2014: data for Serbia are missing (a great flood affected the whole basin in that year which may explain this data gap); first year when the Oil refinery in Brod started to operate and data were recorded; after 2015: no more data for port of Šamac; since 2018 and 2019, data for smaller transhipment places in Serbia started to be collected which explains the increasing amount of transhipped goods recorded in Serbia for those years.

       
       
      Serbia

      • Sremska Mitrovica/Port Leget is a commercial company which administers the port area and focuses mainly on the exploitation of sediment from the Sava riverbed. Its activities are highly dependent on the demand from the construction sector, thereby registering a significant amount of goods such as gravel, sand and stone aggregates.
      • Šabac/Zorka industrial dock was constructed by the one-time chemical industry giant Zorka and is mostly used by the industry basin in Šabac and Valjevo. Transhipment, mostly general and bulk cargo, is carried out at the Zorka industrial dock and to a lesser extent in the water area of Šabac Free Zone. Plans to increase its capacity are underway which should have a positive effect on the transport services market in the foreseeable future.
      • Since 2018, the Agency for Ports of the Republic of Serbia has kept statistical records for other smaller transhipment places. In all these places, there is a significant increase in the overall transhipment, mainly building materials, oil products, coal and sediment dredged from the Sava river-bed and its tributaries.

       
      Croatia

      • In the last ten years, transhipment in the Slavonski Brod Port mostly involved crude oil and stone and, in smaller quantities, grain, sugar, and biofuels as well as some metal industry products and special types of cargo. In 2017, with co-funding from the EU, the Port Authority started works to create new or upgrade the existing waterside infrastructure, the road network and the container terminal (budget: 11 mio. EUR). In addition, announcements of major investments by Croatian Railways and other private investors have been made and negotiations are under way on long-term transport/transhipment contracts.
      • The Port of Sisak (managed by the Sisak Port Authority) is the most upstream port on the Sava river, which has resulted in modest quantities of transhipped goods, mainly crude oil loaded in Slavonski Brod. It is heavily dependent on the hydrological conditions.

       
      Bosnia and Herzegovina

      • Ports in Bosnia and Herzegovina expected and made plans for an increase in the quantities of transhipped goods. However, many factors such as slow economic growth and delays in the implementation of the project of the Sava river waterway rehabilitation also hindered such developments. Activities and talks are under way with the aim of finding a new model for investing in the rehabilitation of the Sava river waterway and its ports.
      • Port of Brčko is located in the proximity of a developed industrial area. It enables a direct goods flow on the Sava river to the Danube ports as well as to ports in the North Sea and Black Sea. It has a good connection to other modes of transport. The equipment allows for transport of grain and bulk cargo. In the last ten years, transhipment mostly involved coal, soybean meal, coke, steel sheets and cold rolled steel strips.
      • Port of Šamac is characterised by large fluctuations in the quantities of transhipped goods. Indeed, it is owned by and is part of a private company and its transhipment depends on the company’s actual production. The port is mostly used for delivering cold-rolled strips and shipping steel pipes.
      • Brod Oil Refinery was established in 1892 by a Hungarian chemical industry company (Danica). Its main advantages are its position on the Sava river, which is navigable between Sisak and its mouth into the Danube and further on to the Black Sea, as well as its proximity to Jadranski Naftovod (JANAF) a company managing an oil pipeline system, and the highway.
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